The F Major Chord for Left-Hand Guitarists

Discover the F major chord for left-handed guitarists with our comprehensive guide. We’ll navigate through three essential variations of F Major, utilizing left-handed guitar chord charts. We’ll also explain the theory behind these chords as we explore scale degrees, intervals, and the foundational principles of chord construction, all from a left-handed perspective.

How to play the F major chord for left-handers

Open position

F Major Chord for left-handers (Open Position)
  1. Finger Placement:
    • Place your index finger on the 1st fret of the high E (1st) string and 1st fret of the B string (2nd).
    • Place your middle finger on the 2nd fret of the G (3rd) string.
    • Place your ring finger on the 3rd fret of the D (4th) string.
  2. Strumming
    • Strum from the D (4th) string down to the high E (1st) string.
    • Avoid strumming the low E (6th) and A (5th) string to keep the chord clean.

F Major Chord – E Barre Shape

F Major Chord - E Barre Shape (for Left-Handers)
  1. Finger Placement:
    • Use your index finger to barre (press down) all the strings at the 1st fret.
    • Place your middle finger (2nd finger) on the 2nd fret of the G (3rd) string.
    • Put your ring finger (3rd finger) on the 3rd fret of the A (5th) string.
    • Position your pinky finger (4th finger) on the 3rd fret of the D (4th) string.
  2. Strumming
    • Strum all six strings from the low E (6th) string down to the high E (1st) string.

F Major Chord – A Barre Shape

F Major Chord - A Barre Shape (Left-Hand)
  1. Finger Placement:
    • Use your index finger (1st finger) to barre (press down) the first 5 strings at the 8th fret.
    • Place your middle finger (2nd finger) on the 10th fret of the D (4thd) string.
    • Put your ring finger (3rd finger) on the 10th fret of the G (3rd) string.
    • Position your pinky finger (4th finger) on the 10th fret of the B (2nd) string.
  2. Strumming
    • Strum the first 5 strings from the A (5th) string down to the high E (1st) string.
    • Ensure your index finger maintains a firm barre across all strings for a clean and clear sound.

F Major Chord – Chord Theory

Before we discuss how the F major chord is constructed, we first need to take a closer look at the F major scale, as the notes of the F major chord are derived from this scale.

F major chord construction – using scale degrees

Scale Degree1234567
F Major ScaleFGABbCDE
F Major ChordFAC
F – G – A – Bb – C – D – E

As we can see in the table above the E major scale consists of the notes: F, G, A, Bb, C, D, and E

As all major chords are built from the 1st, 3rd, and 5th scale degrees of the accompanying major scale the notes for the F major chord are F, A, and C.

F major chord construction – using intervals

IntervalRootM2M3P4P5M6M7
F Major ScaleFGABbCDE
F Major ChordFAC

If you would like to learn more about intervals in music click here.

All major chords include the major third (M3) and perfect fifth (P5) above the root note, which in the case of F major is of course F. The major third interval, A, is four semitones above F, and the perfect fifth (C) is seven semitones above the root.

Tips for Playing F Major

Playing the F major chord on the guitar can be challenging, especially for beginners. To tackle this chord cleanly, start by using the “mini barre” method shown in the open version of the chord (the first example shown above) where you press down only the first two strings with your index finger while fretting the rest of the chord with your other fingers.

Ensure your fingers are close to the frets for a cleaner sound, and practice applying even pressure across the strings to avoid muted notes. Over time, work on strengthening your index finger for a full barre, and play the E barre version of the F major chord. Remember, practice and patience are key when mastering the F major chord.

You can read more tips on playing chords cleanly by clicking here.

About Marty

My name's Marty, I've been tinkering around on left-handed guitars for over 30 years.