G-Major Chord – Left-Handed

Discover the G major chord with our simple guide. Learn three versions of G Major, along with the theory behind the chords all from a left-handed perspective.

How to play the G Major Chord

Open position

  1. Finger Placement:
    • Place your index finger on the 3rd fret of the low E (6th) string.
    • Place your middle finger on the 2nd fret of the A (5th) string.
    • Place your ring finger on the 3rd fret of the high E (1st) string.
  2. Strumming
    • Strum all 6 strings.

G Major Chord – E Barre Shape

  1. Finger Placement:
    • Use your index finger to barre (press down) all the strings at the 3rd fret.
    • Place your middle finger (2nd finger) on the 4th fret of the G (3rd) string.
    • Put your ring finger (3rd finger) on the 5th fret of the A (5th) string.
    • Position your pinky finger (4th finger) on the 5th fret of the D (4th) string.
  2. Strumming
    • Strum all six strings from the low E (6th) string down to the high E (1st) string.

G Major Chord – A Barre Shape

  1. Finger Placement:
    • Place your index finger (1st finger) on the 10th fret of the A string (5th).
    • Use your pinky finger(4th finger) to barre the 10th fret of the B (2nd), G (3rd), and D (4th) string.
  2. Strumming
    • Strum the middle 4 strings from the A (5th) string down to the B (2nd) string.
    • If using your pinky is difficult due to the spacing of the frets, try using your ring finger.

G Major Chord – Chord Theory

Before we discuss how the G major chord is constructed, we first need to take a closer look at the G major scale, as the notes of the G major chord are derived from this scale.

G major chord construction – using scale degrees

Scale Degree1234567
G Major ScaleGABCDEF#
G Major ChordGBD

As we can see in the table above the G major scale consists of the notes: G, A, B, C, D, E, F, F#

As all major chords are built from the 1st, 3rd, and 5th scale degrees of the accompanying major scale the notes for the G major chord are G, B, and D.

G major chord construction – using intervals

IntervalRootM2M3P4P5M6M7
G Major ScaleGABCDEF#
G Major ChordGBD

If you would like to learn more about intervals in music by clicking here.

All major chords include the major third (M3) and perfect fifth (P5) above the root note, which in the case of G major is of course G. The major third interval, B, is four semitones above F, and the perfect fifth (D) is seven semitones above the root.

Tips for Playing G Major

A common issue for beginners when playing G major is unintentionally muting adjacent strings. To avoid this, focus on angling your fingers so that only the intended strings are pressed, and the others can vibrate freely. This might mean adjusting your wrist position to allow your fingers to come down more vertically on the strings.

Practicing chord transitions can also enhance your G major chord play. Transition back and forth between G major and other common chords, like C major or D major. This not only improves your muscle memory for the G major shape but also your overall agility and speed in chord changes.

Pay attention to your strumming hand as well. The clarity of the chord is affected by how and where you strum. Strumming closer to the neck can produce a warmer tone while strumming near the bridge yields a brighter sound.

You can read more tips on playing chords cleanly by clicking here.

About Marty

My name's Marty, I've been tinkering around on left-handed guitars for over 30 years.